Civilization and the Landscape of Discontent   |   Still Life With Transaction   |   Natural Genre   |   The New Capital   |   Final Love   |   Paravision   |   Persona Non Grata   |   Cult and Decorum   |   Time After Time (A Sculpture Show)   |   Spiritual America   |   Ultrasurd   |   Modern Sleep   |   The Antique Future   |   Extreme Order   |   The Ironic Sublime   |   The New Poverty   |   Media Post Media   |   A Deer Manger, A Dress Pattern, Farthest Sea Water, and a Signature   |   Off White   |   Art at the End of the Social   |   Hybrid Neutral   |   Primary Forms, Mediated Structures   |   Pre-Pop Post-Appropriation   |   Buena Vista   |   The Last Laugh   |   A Curatorial Project   |   The Last Decade   |   Sal Scarpitta   |   All Quiet on the Western Front?   |   Who Framed Modern Art or the Quantitative Life of Roger Rabbit   |   Outside America   |   A New Low   |   New Era Space   |   Sal Scarpitta   |   Theoretically Yours   |   Who’s Afraid of Duchamp, Minimalism, and Passport Photography?   |   Needlepoint, Embroidery, Macrame, and Crochet   |   Donna Moylan   |   Meg Webster   |   Charles Clough   |   Elvis Has Left the Building (A Painting Show)   |   Julian Trigo   |   Vik Muniz   |   Claudia Zemborain   |   Sandro Chia   |   Alessandro Twombly   |   Lawrence Carroll   |   Peter Halley   |   A Fistful of Flowers   |   Across the River and into the Trees (A Sculpture Show)   |   Peter Halley   |   Bill Rice   |   Elliot Schwartz   |   Michel Frère   |   Realism After Seven A.M.   |   Malcolm Morley   |   The Evergreen Review Art Auction and Exhibition   |   Barney & Joan   |   Abraham David Christian   |   One Painting, Two Sculptures, Three-Hundred Photographs   |   Saint Clair Cemin   |   Robert Longo   |   Alex Katz   |   Ross Bleckner   |   David Salle   |   Mark Innerst   |   William Anastasi   |   Mimmo Paladino   |   Peter Nagy   |   The Mannequin of History: Art After Fabrications Critique and Culture   |   Skewed: Ruminations on the Writings and Works of Peter Halley, with New Paintings by the Artist

Natural Genre:
From the Neutral Subject to the Hypothesis of World Objects
 
Collins & Milazzo
(Tallahassee, Florida:  Fine Arts Gallery and Museum, School of Visual Arts, Florida State University, 1984)


Spiritual America
 
Collins & Milazzo
(Buffalo, New York:  C.E.P.A., 1986)


The New Poverty

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  John Gibson Gallery, 1987)


Media Post Media

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Scott Hanson Gallery, New York, 1988)


Art at the End of the Social

Collins & Milazzo
(Malmö, Sweden:  The Rooseum, 1988)


Hybrid Neutral:  Modes of Abstraction and the Social

Collins & Milazzo, Gary Indiana
(New York:  Independent Curators, Inc., 1988)


Pre-Pop Post-Appropriation

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Stux Gallery / in cooperation with Leo Castelli Gallery, 1989)


Buena Vista

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  John Gibson Gallery, 1989)


A Curatorial Project:  Ford Beckham
(One-Person Exhibition)Meg Webster (Projects Room);
Sal Scarpitta
(One-Person Exhibition), Robert Rauschenberg (Projects Room), Change Inc. Benefit;
Token Gestures
(A Painting Show), Charles Clough(Projects Room)
Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Scott Hanson Gallery, 1990)


The Last Decade:  American Artists of the ’80s

Collins & Milazzo, Robert Pincus-Witten
(New York:  Tony Shafrazi Gallery, 1990)


Who Framed Modern Art or the Quantitative Life of Roger Rabbit

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Sidney Janis Gallery, 1991)


Outside America:  Going into the 90’s

Collins & Milazzo
(Atlanta, Georgia:  Fay Gold Gallery, 1991)


A New Low

Collins & Milazzo
(Turin, Italy:  Claudio Botello Gallery, 1991)


Sal Scarpitta:  New Works

Collins & Milazzo, Thomas McEvilley
(New York:  Annina Nosei / in cooperation with Leo Castelli Gallery, 1991)


Theoretically Yours

Collins & Milazzo
(Aosta, Italy:  Regione Autonoma della Valle d’Aosta, Chiesa di San Lorenzo, 1992)


Who’s Afraid of Duchamp, Minimalism, and Passport Photography?

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Annina Nosei Gallery, 1992)


Elvis Has Left the Building
(A Painting Show)
Collins & Milazzo
(521 West 23rd Street, New York / sponsored by Sandro Chia, 1993)


Vik Muniz:  Photographs and Sculptures

Collins & Milazzo
(New York:  Grand Salon / Verona, Italy:  Ponte Pietra, 1993)


Sandro Chia:  Small Bronze Sculptures

Collins & Milazzo
(New York: 
Grand Salon, New York, 1994)


Alessandro Twombly:  Paintings

Collins & Milazzo
(New York: 
Grand Salon, New York, 1994)
 

Across the River and into the Trees (A Sculpture Show)
Collins & Milazzo
(Woodbury, New York:  The Rushmore Festival, 1994)


Bill Rice:  New Paintings

Richard Milazzo, Ed Burns
(New York:  11, rue Larrey at Sidney Janis Gallery, 1996)


Michel Frère:  New Paintings

Richard Milazzo, Michel Frère
(New York:  11, rue Larrey at Sidney Janis Gallery, 1996)


Sandro Chia:  New Paintings

Richard Milazzo, Sandro Chia
(New York:  Sidney Janis Gallery, 1996)


Realism After Seven A.M.:
Realist Painting After Edward Hopper –
An Exhibition of 25 Artists in Honor of the 25th Anniversary of the Hopper House

Richard Milazzo
(Nyack, New York:  The Hopper House, Nyack, 1996)


Alessandro Twombly:  New Sculpture

Richard Milazzo
(New York:  11, rue Larrey at Sidney Janis Gallery, 1997).


Malcolm Morley: Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings, Sculptures

Richard Milazzo, Achille Bonito Oliva
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 1998)


Barney & Joan: Barney Rosset’s Photographs of Joan Mitchell

Richard Milazzo
(New York:  James Danziger Gallery, 1998)


La Salle des Pieds Perdus:
The Sculptures and Drawings of Abraham David Christian

Richard Milazzo
(New York:  Annina Nosei Gallery, 1999)


Saint Clair Cemin:  Bronzes

Richard Milazzo
(Brussels, Belgium:  Gallery Velge & Noirhomme, 1999)


Ross Bleckner:  Paintings 1997-1999

Richard Milazzo, Achille Bonito Oliva
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 1999)


Sandro Chia:  New Paintings

Richard Milazzo
(Brussels, Belgium:  Velge & Noirhomme, Brussels, Belgium, 2000)


Robert Longo:  1980-2000

Richard Milazzo
(monograph)
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 2000)


Alex Katz:  New Paintings, 2001-2002

Richard Milazzo, Achille Bonito Oliva
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 2003)


Alessandro Twombly:  New Paintings

Richard Milazzo
(Brussels, Belgium:  Gallery Alain Noirhomme, Brussels, Belgium, 2003)


David Salle:  New Paintings, 1999-2003

Richard Milazzo, Achille Bonito Oliva
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 2003)


Robert Longo: Fire, Water, Rock, 2003-2005

Richard Milazzo, Achille Bonito Oliva
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 2005)


Mark Innerst: Paintings of New York, 2005-2006

Richard Milazzo
(monograph)
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, 2007)


William Anastasi: Paintings, Small Works, Drawings

Richard Milazzo
(monograph)
(Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Gallery, Modena, Italy, 2009)


The Flower Paintings of Ross Bleckner

Richard Milazzo
(monograph)
(Modena, Italy:  Galleria Mazzoli Editions, 2011)


Mimmo Paladino: New Paintings, 2008-2011

Richard Milazzo
(Modena, Italy:  Galleria
Mazzoli Editions, 2012)


Peter Nagy:
Entertainment Erases History – Works 1982 to 2004 to the Present

Richard Milazzo
(monograph)
(New York:  EISBox Projects, 2014)

 

The Mannequin of History:
Art After Fabrications of Critique and Culture

Richard Milazzo
(Modena, Italy: Franco Cosimo Panini, 2015) 


Skewed:
Ruminations on the Writings and Works of Peter Halley

Richard Milazzo
with an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini and Pietro Traversa
(Modena, Italy: Galleria Mazzoli Editore, 2016)

Art at the End of the Social
Collins & Milazzo
With a Swedish translation by Stefan Sandelin.
First edition:  1988.
376 pages, with a color cover by Robert Gober and 177 color reproductions,
11.25 x 9.25 in., printed and bound by Bohusläningens Boktryckeri AB, Uddevalla, Sweden.
ISBN-10:  0-945295-03-3.
Malmö, Sweden:  The Rooseum, 1988.

 

The Last Decade:  American Artists of the ’80s
Collins & Milazzo
With essays by Tricia Collins and Richard Milazzo, and Robert Pincus-Witten,
and black and white photographic portraits of the artists by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders.
First edition:  March 1990.
140 pages, with 35 color reproductions, 12.25 x 9.5 in., printed in the United States.
New York:  Tony Shafrazi Gallery, 1990

 

Who Framed Modern Art or the Quantitative Life of Roger Rabbit
Collins & Milazzo
First edition:  March 1991.
32 pages, with 12 color reproductions, 7.5 x 9.5 in., printed and bound the United States.
New York:  Sidney Janis Gallery, 1991.

 

Sal Scarpitta:  New Works
Collins & Milazzo
With texts by Tricia Collins and Richard Milazzo, and Thomas McEvilley
and Giorgio Franchetti.
First edition:  1991.
32 pages, with 1 black and white and 8 color reproductions, 9.5 x 9.5 in.,
printed and bound the United States.
New York:  Annina Nosei, in cooperation with Leo Castelli, 1991.

 

Theoretically Yours
Collins & Milazzo
With an Italian translation by GianCarlo Pagliasso, Renato Ghiazza, Anne-Maryse Newmann.
First edition:  May 1992.
228 pages, with a 4-colour cover by Philip Taaffe and transparent plastic jacket,

36 black and white photographs and 35 color reproductions,
8.75 x 9.25 x .75 in., printed and bound in Italy.

Aosta, Italy:  Museum of the Regione Autonoma della Valle d’Aosta,
Chiesa di San Lorenzo, 1992.

 

Malcolm Morley: Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings, Sculpture
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Anel Bedy, Massimiliano Gioni, Gianni Romano.
First edition deluxe hardback:  September 1998.
104 pages, with a 4-colour cover and transparent plastic jacket,
pages printed in various colors, a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece
by Roger Tully, 29 color and 5 black and white reproductions,
13.50 x 19.5 x .75 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
ISBN-10:  1-893207-10-2.  ISBN-13:  978-606-8229-48-5.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 1998.

Richard Milazzo’s essay, “Malcolm Morley: The Art of the Superreal, the Rough, the Neo-Classical, and the Incommensurable,” in this exhibition catalogue, Malcolm Morley: Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings, Sculptures, analyzes many of the most seminal paintings the artist executed from 1958 to 1998, as well as all of the sculptures and several of the watercolors and drawings. Written old school style, this monograph closely scrutinizes the relation between the artist’s life and work. He examines the two post-World War II art movements that Malcolm Morley founded – the Superrealism of the 1960’s and 1970’s and the Neo-Expressionism of the 1980’s –, as well as the most recent work of the 1990’s, which the author contends is a synthesis of the first two bodies of work and identifies as ‘Neo-Classical’.

The author analyzes these three periods through his theory of the incommensurable which attempts to locate and explain — and which reflects Morley’s own efforts to explore — the discrepancies existing between the artist’s subconscious and his well-known grid technique. The author shows that it is precisely the ‘mistakes’ or ‘slip-ups’ generated by the libido of the individual in conflict with the ‘superego’ or overriding rational systems of art and history that result in the visionary blindness of the artist. He writes: “What all the phases of Malcolm Morley’s life and work have in common are the boats – whether the giant ocean liners of his Superrealist paintings or the more modest sail and ‘life’ boats of his Neo-Expressionist works; and, in a sense, they can all be related to the toy model, H.M.S. Nelson, he lost as a child in World War II. All the subsequent boats can be viewed as a reenactment of the painful loss of innocence or as an excruciating separation and ultimate loss of this beloved mother ship or object of desire. Combined with the adulterations of later life, it can be seen that the artist has spent his whole life recuperating from the trauma of this symbolic loss.” Traveling timelessly and relentlessly through a Cézanne-like space – which “becomes more dimensional the more it is flattened” – to salvage his symbolic, beloved ‘Rosebud’ from the wreck of History, Morley rediscovers at the end what he already knew at the beginning: that this ‘object’ is lodged ultimately, deeply, forever in the port soul of his art.

According to the author, Malcolm Morley tried from the very beginning to fill symbolically the holes of his existence – from the bombed-out wall in his bedroom during the war (which destroyed his toy boat) to the hole literally under the kitchen sink which he could not repair or fill during his first job after he got out of prison, to the break-ins and prison cells (that were his first ‘studios’), to the portholes, fissures, and folds in his paintings. In the spirit of Cézanne (and Barnett Newman), Morley becomes perversely a defender of the illusionism of painting through its materic values (flatness, as well as facture), even as he battles against personal and social disillusionment and struggles for the mythic or primitive and the tragic or ‘slip-up’ over the binding super-structural ideas and ideologies of art and society, among which he counts the ‘grid’ both as a technique in his work that he favors and as the preeminent symbolic mode of rationality that he persistently questions. Where family, religion, ideology, and even beauty are found to be wanting, or even corrupt, as values, Morley asserts instead the experience of transformation as a mode of outer and inner transcendence or “deeper unexpectedness.” The artist, as a blind man, can he as such perhaps dream in colors and forms never before glimpsed?

At the end of this long essay, Richard Milazzo asks and answers the following questions: “Is the figure with blank, green eyes or sunglasses who dominates the scene [in Aegean Crime], Oedipus, who unknowingly kills his father, sleeps with his mother, and then plucks out his own eyes in retribution? Or is he the blind man Malcolm Morley encountered as a young boy of five or six long ago along the boardwalk in a seaside town on the English Channel in 1930’s? Is the crime blindness – the artist’s, ours, the universe’s? Do the green eyes or sunglasses reflect the enormous incommensurability of the cosmos itself or are they transparent to the cosmos as a rhetorical figure, waiting to be re-invented at the drop of a coin in a blind man’s tin cup? Where civilization could once transform the blind man into a prophet or a visionary, can culture now only convert vision into blindness, tragedy into bathos, and the unconscious itself into a form of kitsch? So what is it in the end that blocks our view, and makes us see only what we want to see in the heart of man – murder or some other unspeakable crime? I think people subconsciously want to see this dark thing in Morley because of what they actually see there – a radically uncompromised practice that will stop at nothing, that will acknowledge no boundary, to achieve its end. They want to see Caravaggio’s misdeeds in Morley because what they really want to see is a form or level of painting that is as defiant and definite in our time as Caravaggio’s was in his. And this is just another way to get to it.” In the end, this is precisely what the author argues they get in the artist’s work.

 

Ross Bleckner:  Paintings, 1997-1999
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Aldo Tagliaferri and Paul Vangelisti.
First edition deluxe hardback:  October 1999.
92 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Allen Zindman, 24 color reproductions,
13.50 x 15.5 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (PC), Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 1999.

 

Robert Longo:  1980-2000
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Manuela Brushini and Steve Piccolo.
First edition deluxe hardback:  November 2000.
184 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Garrick Imatani,
70 color reproductions, 15.5 x 12.5 x 1 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2000.

 

Alex Katz:  New Paintings
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Manuela Brushini and Paul Vangelisti.
First edition deluxe hardback:  January 2003.
138 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Vivien Bittencourt, 29 color reproductions,
13.50 x 15.5 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2003.

 

Alessandro Twombly:  New Paintings
Richard Milazzo
First edition hardback:  September 2003.
48 pages, with a 2-colour gatefold jacket, a black and white photograph of the artist
on the frontispiece by the author, 11 color reproductions, 3 black and white photographs of the artist by the author,
13.25 x 9.75 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Brussels, Belgium.
Brussels, Belgium:  Gallery Alain Noirhomme, 2003.

 

David Salle:  New Paintings
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Aldo Tagliaferri and Steve Piccolo.
First edition deluxe hardback:  October 2003.
140 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Ralph Gibson, 29 color reproductions,
13.50 x 15.5 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2003.

 

Robert Longo:  Fire, Water, Rock  2003-2005
Richard Milazzo
With an essay by Richard Milazzo and a text by Achille Bonito Oliva
and Italian and English translations by Manuela Brushini and Paul Vangelisti.
First edition hardback:  June 2005.
112 pages, with a black silk slipcase, a black and white jacket,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Brian Gilmartin,
33 black and white reproductions, a black and white photograph of the artist by the author,
13.25 x 9.75 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
 Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2005.

 

The Paintings of Ross Bleckner
Richard Milazzo
First edition hardback:  January 2007.
460 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, a black and white photograph of the artist
on the frontispiece by Ralph Gibson, 134 color reproductions, 250 black and white illustrations,
13.25 x 9.75 x 1.75 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Savignano sul Panaro, Modena, Italy.
ISBN-10:  2-930487-01-1.  ISBN-13:  978-930487-01-4.
Brussels, Belgium:  Éditions Alain Noirhomme, 2007.

The Paintings of Ross Bleckner is the first monograph on the artist covering thirty years of his work, from 1976 to 2006. About the book, the author Richard Milazzo writes: “The work has always been interested in bringing abstract painting closer to the realities of the external world, while endeavoring to plumb the depths of the subliminal realm of the psyche. Much lauded for the work Bleckner has done for ACRIA, the American Community Research Institute Initiative on AIDS, and as an outspoken advocate of the fight against the disease since the late 1980s, his paintings are symbolic expressions of a larger humanity, and, as such, also comprise formal as well as social values.”

Further, he explains: “Bleckner’s work can be appreciated also for its ‘non-signature qualities – for his independent-mindedness and his willingness and ability to change the ‘look’ of his paintings whenever he has seen fit to do so, something he has done relentlessly since the very beginning of his career in the 1970s. So, rather than commence where his retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York left off, in 1995, this book traces the development of the artist’s work through all its various phases, and tries to show, with the greatest possible detail, its multifaceted nature.”

The monograph begins with an analysis of Bleckner’s much overlooked Constructivist and Post-Constructivist paintings of the 1970s. It continues with chapter by chapter studies of all the series: the Stripe, Weather, Chandelier, and Memorial (or AIDS) paintings of the early to mid-1980s; the Post-Memorial or Stripe paintings reprised, the Unknown Quantities of Light, the Knight/Night and Architecture of the Sky series of the mid- to late 1980s; the Examined Life and Flower paintings of the early to mid-1990s; the Dream and Do, Cell and DNA works of the mid- to late 1990s; and the Specific and Anonymous, Inheritance, Protein, and Meditation paintings of the New Millennium.

Whether they are motivated by the brutal realism of the Cell paintings, the faint hope implicit in the Protein series, or the contemplative qualities of the new Meditation paintings, these images fly, and fall, like Icarus, through the divine vaults of humanity to the great ‘oculus’ or void at their very center: they are nothing, these works, if they do not examine mortality as the extreme expression of art. As another writer put it, it is “death as the ultimate artistic expression” that is at stake here. And this falling, is it not a “stepping into the eternal” – the ultimate groundlessness of the transcendent?

In addition to the intensive analysis of each of the works, The Paintings of Ross Bleckner contains 250 black and white illustrations, 134 color plates of Bleckner’s most seminal works, a comprehensive history of his exhibitions, and a complete bibliography.

 

Mark InnerstPaintings of New York, 2005-2007
Richard Milazzo
With an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini.
First edition deluxe hardback:  October 2007.
200 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors,
a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by the author,
a black and white photographic self-portrait of the artist on the frontispiece, 49 color reproductions,
13.50 x 15.5 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Savignano sul Panaro, Modena, Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2007.

 

William Anastasi: Paintings, Small Works, Drawings
Richard Milazzo
With an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini.
First edition deluxe hardback:  May 2009.
240 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, pages printed in various colors, a black and white photograph of the artist
on the frontispiece by the author, 35 color reproductions, 112 black and white illustrations,
15.75 x 12.5 x 1.5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Modena, Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Galleria Mazzoli Editore, 2009.

 

Mark InnerstNew Paintings, 2006-2008
Richard Milazzo
First edition hardback:  November 2009.
88 pages, with a 4-color jacket, a black and white photographic self-portrait of the artist on the frontispiece,
32 color reproductions, 2 black and white illustrations,12 x 12.25 x .5 in.,
printed, sewn, and bound in Modena, Italy.
ISBN-13:  978-930487-07-6.
Brussels, Belgium:  Gallery Alain Noirhomme, 2009.

 

The Flower Paintings of Ross Bleckner
Richard Milazzo
First edition hardback:  January 2011.
460 pages, with a 4-colour jacket, a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece by Robert Banat,
126 color reproductions, 200 black and white illustrations,
13.25 x 9.75 x 1.75 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Castelvetro, Piacentino (Pc), Italy.
Modena, Italy:  Emilio Mazzoli Editore, 2011.

The Flower Paintings of Ross Bleckner by Richard Milazzo is the most comprehensive study of the artist’s work since the author’s monograph, The Paintings of Ross Bleckner, was published in Brussels in 2007, and since the catalogue for Bleckner’s retrospective exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York in 1995.

“Why analyze the floral portion of Bleckner’s work,” the author asks, “considering the diversity of his vision and his non-signature style? Because they become a primary and recursive part of his work, and because he sees the flower as the figure that most closely embodies the relation between mortality and the human condition. It is this ‘figure,’ perhaps even more than his infamous stripes, cells and birds, that will come to exemplify the relation between darkness and light, abstraction and figuration, and ultimately, epitomize the psychological object of desire, the flower’s fragility and transience, as such, appealing most of all to him.”

The flowers in Bleckner’s work have always been, from the very beginning, a ‘vehicle’ to explore this object or ‘tenor’ of transformation. The metaphor at work in the paintings is that of mortality, and the working method, that of methodological and metaphysical doubt. From the early ‘still lifes’ and sublime ‘landscapes’ of the Constructivist and Suprematist period, from 1976 to 1983, to the subtlest or symbolic, and sometimes kitsch, functions of the Memorial (or Commemoration) paintings and the Examined Life series, from 1985 to 1991; from the expressive immediacy of the classical Flower or Hothouse paintings, including the Yellow and Black series, from 1992 to 1997, to the lyrical and ‘documentary’ continuities of the Cell-influenced Inheritance paintings of the new millennium, from 2003 to 2006; from the more structural and spiritual continuities of the Meditation paintings to the rawest of temporalities in the most recent floral series, the Time (or Clock) paintings, from 2006 to 2010, “flowers have functioned basically within the context of a transformational ethos.

In Bleckner’s art, the evolution of the flower will follow a very specific trajectory: depending upon light as a source of energy (photosynthesis), they (the ‘organisms’ or objects of desire) will manifest themselves as pure forms or streams of light (the stripes), evolve into light sources (chandeliers and stars) that will transform themselves into flowers, and then, into cells, and later, into abstract or floral forms of light. The Flower Paintings of Ross Bleckner documents a journey that will carry us through the late works of such artists as Goya, Turner, Monet, de Kooning, and especially, the last flower paintings of Manet, as well Velásquez, Sargent, Malevich, Nolde, Mondrian, Guston, Burchfield, O’Keeffe, Mitchell, Smithson, and such contemporaries, as Twombly, Marden and Kiefer, to the very heart of Bleckner’s work.

 

Mimmo PaladinoNew Paintings, 2008-2011
Richard Milazzo
With an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini.
First edition hardback:  January 2012.
160 pages, with a 4-color gatefold jacket, a black and white photograph of the author
on the frontispiece by Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, 32 black and white illustrations,
13.25 x 9.75 x .5 in., printed, sewn, and bound in Modena, Italy.
Modena (Italy):  Galleria Mazzoli, 2012.

 

Peter Nagy:
Entertainment Erases History – Works 1982 to 2004 to the Present

Richard Milazzo
First edition hardback:  January 2014.
480 pages, with a 2-colour jacket, 120 black and white and 45 color reproductions, 300 black and white illustrations,
15.5 x 13.5 x 1.75 in. (39.3 x 34.3 x 4.4 cm.), printed, sewn, and bound in Turin, Italy.
ISBN-10:  0-615-49792-6.  ISBN-13:  978-0-615-49792-1.
Brooklyn, New York:  EISBox Editions, 2014.

Peter Nagy: Entertainment Erases History – Works 1982 to 2004 to the Present by Richard Milazzo is the first monograph on the artist-dealer. The monograph grew out of a related exhibition the author curated at EISBox Projects, an independent space, in Brooklyn, New York, in April 2011. Where the exhibition focused on the first presentation of all of Nagy’s Xerox works from 1982 to 1984, accompanied by a limited selection of Cancer, Baroque and Rococo, and early Orientalist Paintings, the monograph compiles all, and analyses most, of the artist’s extant works from 1982 to 2004, including the Color Paintings he made in India, where the artist has lived and worked since 1992.


The author discusses also the history of Nagy’s fabled East Village gallery, Nature Morte, within the wider context of the art and culture of the 1980s, and the avant-garde role it continues to play in the world of contemporary art in India today. By the time the artist closed the gallery in New York in 1988, he had created several significant bodies of work, beyond the early Xeroxes: the Cancer Paintings of 1985 and 1986, which addressed through the use of abstraction the ‘cancer’ of global consumption; the metallic works of 1987, which commented on the negative aspects of the technological ‘revolution’; and the Baroque and Rococo Paintings of 1988 and 1989, which appropriated architectural motifs to generate a visionary form of critique in painting. With the Orientalist Paintings of the 1990s, with such series as the Self-Portraits and A Soft History of Imhotep, and his Color Paintings, stupas, and installations, the author elucidates how the artist moved from his earliest utilization of maps, floor plans, and architectural citations and from an American and European vision to a wider global ethos that included Asian or Middle East and Far Eastern cultures. Even as Nagy continued to work as an artist, he reopened Gallery Nature Morte in India, in 1997, to exhibit again the revolutionary art of his time and in the new millenium, this time half way around the world, and begins to work also as a curator and a writer on its behalf.


From his earliest 8½ x 11 in. Xeroxes to his Postmodern ‘altars,’ from his use of collage and montage, the techniques of miniaturization and magnification, to his use of extreme forms of abstraction, synchronicity, heterogeneity, contradiction, complexity and hybridization, critically reflecting the global culture and economy, the corporate Spectacle, all around him, the author shows how Nagy has formulated throughout his oeuvre a unique aesthetic. Like the exhibition, Peter Nagy: Entertainment Erases History – Works 1982 to 2004 to the Present discloses how the paintings, and the work, in general, moved from appropriation to abstraction to a combined use of both methodologies to create overall a body of work that remains unprecedented to this day.


In addition to an intensive, chapter-by-chapter analysis of each individual work and each period, this 480-page monograph contains 291 black and white illustrations, 129 black and white and 45 color reproductions of Nagy’s most seminal works, a timeline, a comprehensive history of his works and exhibitions, and a complete bibliography.

 

The Mannequin of History:
Art After Fabrications of Critique and Culture

Richard Milazzo
First edition deluxe hardback:  September 2015.
With an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini and Pietro Traversa.
352 pages, with a 4-colour gatefold jacket,
188 color and 38 black and white reproductions,
15.5 x 13.5 x 1.75 in. (39.3 x 34.3 x 4.4 com.), printed, sewn and bound in Modena, Italy.
ISBN-13: 978-88-570-1021-2.
Modena, Italy: Franco Cosimo Panini Editore, 2015.

On the occasion of EXPO MODENA 2015, Modena City Council, with the patronage of Region Emilia-Romagna in collaboration with APT Servizi srl and Confindustria Modena, presented an international exhibition of contemporary art, The Mannequin of History: Art After Fabrications of Critique and Culture, curated by Richard Milazzo, and taking place at MATA, the newly renovated Manifattura Tabacchi building which will function as a new cultural center in the future, in Modena, Italy, from September 18, 2015 to January 31, 2016. The exhibition was accompanied by a major book of theory and criticsm.
The exhibition and book included 48 artists from 11 countries (Italy, Libya, Great Britain, Switzerland, Panama, Germany, Brazil, Japan, Iran, China, and America): William Anastasi, Donald Baechler, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Carlo Benvenuto, Ross Bleckner, Alighiero e Boetti, Jake and Dinos Chapman, Sandro Chia, Francesco Clemente, Gregory Crewdson, Enzo Cucchi, Gino De Dominicis, Nicola De Maria, Urs Fischer, Nan Goldin, Felix González-Torres, Andreas Gursky, Peter Halley, Jenny Holzer, Mark Innerst, Alex Katz, Anselm Kiefer, Louise Lawler, Annette Lemieux, Robert Longo, Allan McCollum, Malcolm Morley, Vik Muniz, Takashi Murakami, Shirin Neshat, Luigi Ontani, Mimmo Paladino, Richard Prince, Thomas Ruff, David Salle, Salvo, Mario Schifano, Julian Schnabel, Andres Serrano, Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith, Haim Steinbach, Philip Taaffe, Wolfgang Tillmans, Franco Vaccari, Meg Webster, Chen Zhen.
In a chapter by chapter analysis, the critic and curator Richard Milazzo discusses in detail each of the artists’ contribution to the exhibition and their work in general. In the course of his analysis he argues that “art has been turned into a spectacle, not only by the auction houses, art fairs, commercial galleries, museums, collectors and corporate consortiums, but also by the critics, curators (myself included), and the media, in general, and, to a certain extent, by the artists themselves. Art, as a result, within this spectacle, has been turned into a mannequin.
“In Goya’s cartoon for the tapestry, The Straw Mannikin (1791-92), the figure is tossed into the air by the celebrants, four maidens, holding a blanket. The pretext is a rural and rustic celebration, not unlike this EXPO in Modena or the Venice Biennale, and the presumption is that the maidens will catch him when he falls. If we read this image allegorically, the basic reality is that the figure of the mannequin-as-art is being tossed (up, down, around) by all involved in the celebration, in the games or the spectacles of critique (this one included) and culture.” The author goes on to ask: “In defense of itself, has art, in fact, generated a meta-Spectacle, as it were, to counter the constructions or fabrications of history? In what manner has art formulated or conceptualized itself not so much to protect itself but to elude this fate, its destiny, as a mannequin of history? In the end, is the construction of a meta-Spectacle sufficient to combat the mannequinization of history, whether it is the history of art, critique or culture?”
The catalogue contains 188 color and 38 black and white reproductions, biographies of all the artists, and a checklist of all the works in the show.

 

Skewed:
Ruminations on the Writings and Works of Peter Halley,

with New Paintings by the Artist (a study),
Richard Milazzo
First edition deluxe hardback: November 2016.
With an Italian translation by Brunella Antomarini and Pietro Traversa.
224 pages, with a 3-colour gatefold jacket, a black and white photograph of the artist on the frontispiece
by Andy Warhol, 190 color and black and white illustrations and 12 full-color plate reproductions,
15.5 x 13.5 x 1.75 in. (39.3 x 34.3 x 4.4 cm.), printed, sewn, and bound in Modena, Italy.
Modena, Italy: Galleria Mazzoli Editore, 2016.

Peter Halley: New Paintings – Associations, Proximities, Conversions, Grids is the artist’s first exhibition at Galleria Mazzoli, Modena, November 12, 2016 - January 2017. For this exhibition of twelve new paintings, curated by Richard Milazzo, the curator has prepared a seminal new book, a unique critical document, entitled Skewed: Ruminations on the Writings and Works of Peter Halley.
The author-curator writes: “I have for the past several years been in the process of writing a monograph on Peter Halley’s work. A natural part of this process has been to examine and sometimes question the ideas and principles behind the work, both the paintings and the writings. This is especially important because Halley’s writings became one of the main lynchpins for understanding the art of the 1980s and early 1990s. Some of the ideas expressed in his essays would even forecast developments in art in the twenty-first century. During the last two decades of the twentieth century, Halley produced not only paradigm-shifting paintings, he theorized many of the concepts that went into the making of the art of his generation and beyond, which contributed specifically to the displacement of New-Expressionism in art and the rise of Neo-Conceptual, in general.
“It should be mentioned that the title of this book was inspired, rather ironically, by the only title of Halley’s paintings, Skewed, not included in the subtitle for the show: Peter Halley: New Paintings – Associations, Proximities, Conversions, Grids. In its reference to the title of the painting, it is purely descriptive, given that the paintings themselves are all skewed toward the more Minimal end of Halley’s aesthetic, both in terms of the limited number of colors and the limited number of conduits and cells used in the paintings. However, there is at least one other irony embedded here: instead of writing a catalogue essay about a specific group of paintings, I have chosen to write about writing, Halley’s writings, and, of course, about his art, oddly ‘encouraging’ his essays to proactively skew my text(s), in an attempt to balance somewhat the terms of the ‘exchange’, making whatever is simply discursive here more dialectical.
“Halley’s writings, like his paintings, shined brightly in the 1980s precisely because of their radical and experimental nature, and this cursory (hopefully not too microscopic) re-examination, conducted nearly thirty years later (in the case of certain of these essays), remains in the best spirit of observation and experimentation, a spirit that should animate not only science in general but the arts. If my texts are skewed, they are skewed only by Halley’s writings and paintings, that is, only insofar as they are the content of my observations and ruminations about them. For better and for worse, we are operating here in the dark, in a forest of free-range ideas, where mistakes and missteps (I am sure I am making my share of them) are not encouraged, but nor do they become the reason to suppress speculation, contradiction, unhampered dialogue.”
In addition to the intensive analysis of Peter Halley’s writings (abundantly excerpted in the author’s dialogical text), the book contains 190 color and black and white illustrations, 12 full-color plate reproductions of the artist’s paintings in the show, a comprehensive history of his exhibitions, and a complete bibliography.